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Qian Qianyi's Reflections on Yellow MountainTraces of a Late-Ming Hatchet and Chisel$
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Stephen McDowall

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9789622090842

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789622090842.001.0001

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Hills and Waterways

Hills and Waterways

Yellow Mountain in Seventeenth-Century Visual Culture

Chapter:
(p.49) 3 Hills and Waterways
Source:
Qian Qianyi's Reflections on Yellow Mountain
Author(s):

Stephen McDowall

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789622090842.003.0004

When Guo Xi failed to recognize Yellow Mountain as one of China's great peaks, the link between travel and fine art was already being established. The “recumbent travelling” often associated with Zong Bing played no small part in the changing image of this mountain in the literati world. Correspondingly, painted images were now being recognized as supplements to travel experience. Examining Qian Qianyi's essay about his travels reveal that he complemented his 1641 trip with a viewing of painted images of Yellow Mountain. During this period, the growing economy contributed significantly to art production during the late-Ming period. During this time, images of Yellow Mountain were valued greatly by collectors.

Keywords:   Yellow Mountain, art, travel, Qian Qianyi, art production, consumption

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