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Elaine Yee Lin Ho and Julia Kuehn

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9789622099456

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789622099456.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2014. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use (for details see http://www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 25 September 2016

Affirming Cosmopolitanism? Chineseness and the Chinese Museum of Queensland

Affirming Cosmopolitanism? Chineseness and the Chinese Museum of Queensland

Chapter:
(p.209) 12 Affirming Cosmopolitanism? Chineseness and the Chinese Museum of Queensland
Source:
China Abroad
Author(s):

Tseen Khoo

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789622099456.003.0012

In this context of renewed, often parochial, assertions of Australian identity, examining racialized heritage sites allows the interrogation of the limits of the contemporary appreciation of “cosmopolitanism” and “diversity.” To this end, this chapter focuses on the phenomenon of internal tourism and the ways in which Australian Chinatowns present themselves to internal and external tourists, as well as their local communities. Taking into account Michael Keith's argument for a focus on the dynamics of the city, the chapter discusses the establishment of the Chinese Museum of Queensland alongside the geocultural context of Chinatown in Fortitude Valley. After presenting an overview of Australia's historical (dis)engagement with Chinese migration, the chapter outlines the socio-political setting of Brisbane and Fortitude Valley and the idea of “Chinatowns,” before concentrating on the development of the museum and the motivations of its initial steering committee as a case-study in affirming Chineseness.

Keywords:   cosmopolitanism, internal tourism, Australia, Michael Keith, Chinese Museum of Queensland, Chinatown, Fortitude Valley, migration, Chineseness

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