Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Bilingual EducationSoutheast Asian Perspectives$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Angela M. Y. Lin and Evelyn Y. F. Man

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9789622099586

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789622099586.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use (for details see http://www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 November 2017

Research on Bilingual Education in Hong Kong

Research on Bilingual Education in Hong Kong

Chapter:
(p.86) (p.87) 5 Research on Bilingual Education in Hong Kong
Source:
Bilingual Education
Author(s):

Angel M. Y. Lin

Evelyn Y. F. Man

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789622099586.003.0005

In this chapter, an overview of key empirical studies conducted on issues related to the medium of instruction in Hong Kong schools is presented. The overview follows a chronological order and covers key studies in four main periods: (1) from the 1970s to the early 1980s, (2) the 1980s, (3) the 1990s, and (4) the 2000s. Major research findings in the past three decades point to the general lack of prerequisites for the successful implementation of English-medium education in the majority of secondary schools in Hong Kong. The unfavourable conditions found in these allegedly English-medium schools include: (1) inadequate English skills of the students to benefit from studying in English, (2) lack of language support provided by the school to these students, (3) lack of professional development opportunities for both EMI content teachers and English language subject teachers, (4) lack of Language Across the Curriculum (LAC) co-ordination: little co-ordination among EMI content teachers themselves as well as between the EMI content teachers and English language subject teachers, and (5) unsuccessful design and implementation of the existing Bridging Courses (i.e. the Longman and Macmillan Bridging Courses). In the final section of this chapter, some future directions for research are outlined.

Keywords:   Medium of instruction, English medium instruction (EMI), English-medium education, Bilingual education, Hong Kong

Hong Kong Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .