Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
International Education and the Chinese Learner$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Janette Ryan and Gordon Slethaug

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9789888028450

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888028450.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use (for details see http://www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 August 2017

Being, Becoming, and Belonging:Exploring Hong Kong-Chinese Students’ Experiences of the Social Realities of International Schooling

Being, Becoming, and Belonging:Exploring Hong Kong-Chinese Students’ Experiences of the Social Realities of International Schooling

Chapter:
(p.73) 4 Being, Becoming, and Belonging:Exploring Hong Kong-Chinese Students’ Experiences of the Social Realities of International Schooling
Source:
International Education and the Chinese Learner
Author(s):

Eric Jabal

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888028450.003.0005

This chapter considers the lived schooling realities of ten Hong Kong-Chinese international school students. It uses data from a mixed-method PhD study undertaken to understand better student engagement within the international schools in Hong Kong. This research agenda arises from professional experiences in France and Hong Kong as an international school teacher-administrator and from scholarly understanding developed as a graduate student in the United Kingdom and Canada. The specific research interest stems from concern about the ways in which international schools seem to “look after the interests of some more privileged social groups better than [they] look after the interests of some other sociocultural groups.” Though all schools ought to respond to the voices of the diverse range of people, the chapter believes that private schools, in particular, many of which are part of the international education arena, have an even greater duty and opportunity to achieve the twin aims of inclusivity and excellence.

Keywords:   lived schooling, international school, Hong Kong, private schools, social groups, international education

Hong Kong Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .