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Nurturing Pillars of SocietyUnderstanding and Working with the Young Generation in Hong Kong$
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Francis Wing-lin Lee

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9789888028801

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888028801.001.0001

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Juvenile Justice Issues (1): The Age of Criminal Responsibility and the “Family Conference”

Juvenile Justice Issues (1): The Age of Criminal Responsibility and the “Family Conference”

Chapter:
(p.143) 13 Juvenile Justice Issues (1): The Age of Criminal Responsibility and the “Family Conference”
Source:
Nurturing Pillars of Society
Author(s):

Francis Wing-lin Lee

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888028801.003.0013

In achieving a guilty finding in the Hong Kong legal system, both criminal intent or Mens Rea and the criminal act itself or Actus Reus have to be proven. It is important to note that the age considered to be mature enough to foster criminal intent, however, differs from country to country because of variations in social environment and culture. Today, the minimum age of criminal responsibility has shifted from seven to 10 as a result of recommendations made by the Bar Association of Hong Kong and the United Nations Committee on Children's Rights. As heated debates were stirred because of this issue, A Bill Committee on the Juvenile Offenders Bill 2001 was formulated in July 2002 so that the issue could be given further examination. After the final legislation was passed, the ordinance became law in July 2003.

Keywords:   Mens Rea, Actus Reus, criminal intent, criminal responsibility, minimum age

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