Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The British Presence in Macau, 1635-1793$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Rogerio Miguel Puga

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9789888139798

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888139798.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use (for details see http://www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 November 2017

The arrival of the English in Macau

The arrival of the English in Macau

Chapter:
(p.26) (p.27) 3 The arrival of the English in Macau
Source:
The British Presence in Macau, 1635-1793
Author(s):

Rogério Miguel Puga

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888139798.003.0004

The retreat of the English from the Far East was temporary. The Convention of Goa, signed in 1635, opened the gateway to Macau once again for the English vessels. The convention was signed with the view to defend both English and Portuguese interests in the face of Dutch threats in the East. English vessels would be chartered from Surat to carry goods from Macau in order to bypass the Dutch embargo. Yet, to maintain their privileged positions, the Portuguese forbade English crews to land and have contact with the local population. The English searched for other routes to set up trade with China. The English presence in the East was strengthened when Charles II received Bombay as part of Catherine of Braganza’s dowry in 1662.

Keywords:   Convention of Goa, Bombay, Catherine of Braganza, Mandarin Authorities, Trade with China, Macau, China, British Overseas

Hong Kong Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .