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Transnational RepresentationsThe State of Taiwan Film in the 1960s and 70s$
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James Wicks

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9789888208500

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888208500.001.0001

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Two Stage Brothers:

Two Stage Brothers:

Tracing a Common Heritage in Xie Jin and Li Xing’s Early 1960s Films

Chapter:
(p.23) 2 Two Stage Brothers
Source:
Transnational Representations
Author(s):

James Wicks

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888208500.003.0002

The second chapter proposes that the most important link between Mainland Chinese director Xie Jin and Taiwan director Li Xing’s films during the Cold War was the influence of Shanghai’s film tradition of realist aesthetics in the 1930s and 1940s, an aesthetic identifiable less by its accurate replication of reality on the screen than by its fascinating representation of the dominant ideology and distinctive expression of the production values of the time. This Shanghai tradition was the root of a common cinematic language that flourished on both sides of the Strait after 1949, even though there were unique parameters inherent to each film culture after the Communist victory in the civil war. Despite different political and historical situations, and despite the way these directors are usually framed in the polarizing terms of difference associated with the Cold War, the films of Xie Jin and Li Xing are remarkably similar. In order to make this case, three sets of films are analyzed so that one might recognize narrative similarities, consider the personal experiences which shaped Xie Jin’s and Li Xing’s craft, and observe the lineage of realist filmic techniques that link the two filmmakers in interesting ways.

Keywords:   Taiwan Cinema, Chinese Cinema, Cold War, Xie Jin, Li Xing

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