Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Hong Kong Land for Hong Kong People$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Yue Chim Richard Wong

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9789888208654

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888208654.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use (for details see www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 25 April 2019

On Public Housing Policy and Social Justice

On Public Housing Policy and Social Justice

Chapter:
(p.65) 9 On Public Housing Policy and Social Justice
Source:
Hong Kong Land for Hong Kong People
Author(s):

Yue Chim Richard Wong

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888208654.003.0009

Both public rental housing and HOS housing in Hong Kong are financed through monetizing part of the land values of the HOS units. The land values are not fully monetized because part of the land premium is still unpaid and not wholly settled with the Housing Authority. It would make good sense today to develop a single subsidized housing program so the units are available for both rent and purchase, tenants having the option of renting first and purchasing later, as in the case of Singapore’s public housing scheme. Our low-income households would be more than willing to purchase these units if they were priced at an affordable level for them. As long as they are priced to cover at least full development costs, the government would be able to finance the entire cost of providing subsidized housing through monetizing land values. These low-income households would be able to benefit at nobody else’s expense. This would drive government spending on housing down to zero and would help reduce government spending pressure enormously, making scarce government revenues available for other uses.

Keywords:   Hong Kong, Housing, Housing policy, Public Housing, Politics, Social mobility, Population, Economics, Growth

Hong Kong Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .