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Enclave to UrbanityCanton, Foreigners, and Architecture from the Late Eighteenth to the Early Twentieth Centuries$
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Johnathan Andrew Farris

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9789888208876

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888208876.001.0001

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Westerners Draw Their Boundaries

Westerners Draw Their Boundaries

Insular Living and Its Exceptions

Chapter:
(p.67) Chapter 2 Westerners Draw Their Boundaries
Source:
Enclave to Urbanity
Author(s):

Johnathan Andrew Farris

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888208876.003.0002

Chapter 2 will cover the period encapsulated between circa 1860 and 1905. The victorious belligerents of the Arrow War, Britain and France, were granted substantial indemnity funds and the rights to construct a foreign concession in the form of an island in the river called Shamian, literally “sand-face,” after its origin as a sand bar. The Americans made an attempt to negotiate their own concession on the old factory site, but their use of this property was short-lived. The questions raised by this era revolve around an increasing isolation of the trading community from the Chinese populace, as well as the arrival of increasing numbers of missionaries whose job was, in contrast, to engage everyday Cantonese

Keywords:   Guangzhou, China, Architectural history, Culture, Social history, eighteenth century, Enclave, the Thirteen Factories era

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