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Making IconsRepetition and the Female Image in Japanese Cinema, 1945-1964$
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Jennifer Coates

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9789888208999

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888208999.001.0001

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Bodies of Excess

Bodies of Excess

Chapter:
(p.174) 7 Bodies of Excess
Source:
Making Icons
Author(s):

Jennifer Coates

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888208999.003.0008

The final chapter deals with recurring motifs that resist categorization, motifs which can be understood as excessive or abject. From the streetwalking sex workers known as panpan, to the shape-shifting female monsters of the horror genre, this chapter considers the affective impacts of representations of the female Other. Excessive star personae such as that of Kyō Machiko are analysed alongside characterizations drawn from myth and legend to demonstrate that the female Other is a recurring trope throughout literature, film, and even journalism. The final section considers the excessive abject icon as a representation of the sublime. Case studies include Women of the Night (Yoru no onnatachi, Mizoguchi Kenji, 1948), White Beast (Shiroi yajū, Naruse Mikio, 1950) and Gate of Flesh (Nikutai no mon, Suzuki Seijun, 1964).

Keywords:   Excess, abject, panpan, monster, Other

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