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Returning Home with GloryChinese Villagers around the Pacific, 1849 to 1949$
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Michael Williams

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9789888390533

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888390533.001.0001

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He Would Have to Send Money

He Would Have to Send Money

Chapter:
(p.98) 5 He Would Have to Send Money
Source:
Returning Home with Glory
Author(s):

Michael Williams

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888390533.003.0005

In this chapter is discussed the mechanisms and the motives through which life in a qiaoxiang such as Long Du was influenced by the qiaoxiang connections and how developments arose that resulted in some never returning to their “big house”. The motivations for establishing and maintaining these links will be examined. Here is investigated the mechanisms, or those tangible elements, which ensured that money, information, and people were constantly transferred between the qiaoxiang and the Pacific Ports. Sending money, being kept informed on family and qiaoxiang affairs, regular visits, and even ensuring that one’s bones returned after death were all part of the qiaoxiang links. These connections were sustained through the establishment of associations in the destinations, as well as through services provided by stores and businesses. How these elements were established, maintained, and evolved over distance, time, and generations, and how their development helped to sustain the qiaoxiang links is investigated here. The presence of the family in the qiaoxiang was central to the evolution of these mechanisms. Those in the qiaoxiang did not remain passive in this interaction and, through their letters and more formally through the qiaokan, made efforts to keep the huaqiao connected and supportive.

Keywords:   Huaqiao pattern, Remittances, Qiaokan, Magazines, Gold Mountain Firms, Bones return, District associations, Qiaoxiang

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