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The Search for a Vanishing BeijingA Guide to China's Capital Through the Ages$
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M. A. Aldrich

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9789622097773

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789622097773.001.0001

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Historical Overview

Historical Overview

Chapter:
(p.35) 3 Historical Overview
Source:
The Search for a Vanishing Beijing
Author(s):

M. A. Aldrich

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789622097773.003.0018

This chapter provides a historical overview of Peking. Peking first emerges in Chinese records of the Western Zhou dynasty (1027 to 770 BC). Starting in 403 BC, the Warring States period marked the final collapse of the nominal authority of the Zhou dynasty. This era also inculcated a deeply rooted fear of chaos in Chinese social thinking. Different dynasties of China are specifically described here. Chinese history seemed to slow down once Deng Xiao Ping inherited the Mandate of Heaven. Peking politics in the 1980s did not witness the dizzying volume of change as in prior years. By the 1990s, Peking had begun to experience economic growth that raised people's standard of living but snuffed out the remnants of Old Peking that somehow survived the brutality of the twentieth century.

Keywords:   Peking, Chinese history, Western Zhou dynasty, Chinese social thinking, politics, Deng Xiao Ping, Mandate of Heaven

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