Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
East Asian Pop CultureAnalysing the Korean Wave$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Beng Huat Chua and Koichi Iwabuchi

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9789622098923

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789622098923.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2021. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Structure of Identification and Distancing in Watching East Asian Television Drama

Structure of Identification and Distancing in Watching East Asian Television Drama

Chapter:
(p.72) (p.73) 4 Structure of Identification and Distancing in Watching East Asian Television Drama
Source:
East Asian Pop Culture
Author(s):

Chua Beng Huat

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789622098923.003.0005

This chapter aims to address the question, “How does an audience watch/read an imported cultural drama series?” It develops a comprehensive, relatively formal, conceptual framework for the analysis of pan-Asian, transnational pop culture consumption. It specifically explores the circulation and reception of media products in locations where an ethnic-Chinese population predominates, namely the People Republic of China (PRC), Hong Kong, Taiwan and Singapore. The possible emergence of a pan-East Asian “community of consumers” and its implication is also investigated. Before exploring the reception of imported drama series, one significant peculiarity of their circulation in Pop Culture China should be noted. It then deals with the question of dubbing and its effect on the audience. Regional marketing of pop cultures is now configured into their production cost. The predominantly ethnic-Chinese locations constitute a subset within East Asia and can be conceptually designated as Pop Culture China, with histories of established networks of production and consumption of Chinese language based genres of pop culture.

Keywords:   East Asian television drama, Pop Culture China, dubbing, pop culture, cultural drama series, ethnic-Chinese population, imported drama

Hong Kong Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .