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Asian CrossingsTravel Writing on China, Japan and Southeast Asia$
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Steve Clark and Paul Smethurst

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9789622099142

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789622099142.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2021. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use.date: 25 June 2021

‘The First Appearance of This Celebrated Capital’; or, What Mr. Barrow Saw in the Land of the Chinaman

‘The First Appearance of This Celebrated Capital’; or, What Mr. Barrow Saw in the Land of the Chinaman

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(p.30) (p.31) 2 ‘The First Appearance of This Celebrated Capital’; or, What Mr. Barrow Saw in the Land of the Chinaman
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Asian Crossings
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Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789622099142.003.0003

This chapter may be regarded as a test case for generic mutation through the stages of letter, archive, and published narrative; and for travelogue as diplomacy, with specific political consequences, a high degree of cultural visibility, and an editing out of the highly collaborative nature of the endeavour (the legation was over 3000-strong). The displayed quote from Samuel Holmes' journal contains several conundrums for travel writers that are addressed in this chapter. Of the writers considered, Aeneas Anderson, more so than George Staunton and John Barrow, relies heavily on the conventions of travel writing, dutifully recording times, dates, locations and other common elements. All of the travelers shared a great expectation for the Macartney embassy, and in particular they were excited to see the Chinese capital.

Keywords:   John Barrow, George Staunton, Aeneas Anderson, China, travel writing, Macartney embassy

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