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Hong Kong MobileMaking a Global Population$
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Helen F. Siu and Agnes S. Ku

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9789622099180

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789622099180.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2021. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

The Importance of Migration Flow to Hong Kong’s Future

The Importance of Migration Flow to Hong Kong’s Future

Chapter:
(p.88) (p.89) 4 The Importance of Migration Flow to Hong Kong’s Future
Source:
Hong Kong Mobile
Author(s):

Richard Y. C. Wong

Ka-fu Wong

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789622099180.003.0005

With institutional and cultural improvisations facilitated by systems of law regarding custom and rights, Hong Kong has, over the century, absorbed different kinds of migrants and sojourners. The mobile populations have been driven by diverse individual and family strategies. The postwar years saw continuing ebbs and flows of people across Hong Kong's borders. This chapter uses census and other quantitative data to highlight the dramatic changes in the demographic landscape due to the massive population flows from China and discusses the implications for the territory's labor market and subsequent economic development. Hong Kong's population is ageing. The study shows that by 2011 the largest population age group will be those who have turned fifty. The chapter argues that in the absence of major policy changes, the best educated segment of Hong Kong by the year 2031 will be in one of the oldest age categories (55–59).

Keywords:   ageing population, human capital, Mainland China, immigration waves, mobile populations

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