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Maintaining ControlAutonomy and Language Learning$
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Richard Pemberton, Sarah Toogood, and Andy Barfield

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9789622099234

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789622099234.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2019. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

Autonomy and control in curriculum development: ‘Are you teaching what we all agreed?’

Autonomy and control in curriculum development: ‘Are you teaching what we all agreed?’

Chapter:
(p.217) 12 Autonomy and control in curriculum development: ‘Are you teaching what we all agreed?’
Source:
Maintaining Control
Author(s):

Mike Nix

Andy Barfield

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789622099234.003.0012

Transposing different issues to the area of curriculum development, this chapter draws an illuminating parallel between collaborative dialogue in the language classroom and processes of collaborative curriculum development entailing critically engaged dialogues with all participants involved, including students and part-time teaching staff. Relating and reflecting on their own experiences of engaging and coordinating various participant voices in the curriculum development process, this chapter makes the point that there is no curriculum without communication. However, it also highlights the challenge and complexity of this collaborative process, and problematise the notion of “equal, dialogic participation”, given the realities of unequal power relations and divergent perspectives among participants. The chapter concludes that the project of collaborative autonomy must always engage with questions of power.

Keywords:   curriculum development, language classroom, power relations, classroom communication, collaborative autonomy

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