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Maintaining ControlAutonomy and Language Learning$
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Richard Pemberton, Sarah Toogood, and Andy Barfield

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9789622099234

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789622099234.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2021. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use.date: 07 May 2021

Learner autonomy in a mainstream writing course: Articulating learning gains

Learner autonomy in a mainstream writing course: Articulating learning gains

Chapter:
(p.87) 6 Learner autonomy in a mainstream writing course: Articulating learning gains
Source:
Maintaining Control
Author(s):

Sara Cotterall

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789622099234.003.0006

This chapter first refers to previous research into the acquisition of metacognitive knowledge in language learning, and specifically into its role in second language writing. It then provides some background on the writing course and the learners, and explains how the development of metacognitive knowledge was a central and explicit course goal. The main body resents statements about metacognitive knowledge reported in the reflections of learners in the workshop group, and considers the possible relationship between those instances of metacognitive knowledge and the development of learner autonomy. The chapter then discusses some instances where the learners reported having transferred learning gained during the writing course to new situations. Finally, while acknowledging the limitations of the small-scale piece of research, the discussion presents some of the challenges for writing teachers and researchers which it highlights.

Keywords:   metacognitive knowledge, language learning, second language writing, learning transfer

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