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Professional CommunicationCollaboration between Academics and Practitioners$
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Winnie Cheng and Kenneth C. C. Kong

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9789622099654

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789622099654.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2022. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use.date: 22 May 2022

Gender and Professional Communication: The Role of Feminine Style in Multilingual Workplaces

Gender and Professional Communication: The Role of Feminine Style in Multilingual Workplaces

Chapter:
(p.70) (p.71) 5 Gender and Professional Communication: The Role of Feminine Style in Multilingual Workplaces
Source:
Professional Communication
Author(s):

Hiroko Itakura

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789622099654.003.0005

One of the general claims derived from the studies regarding the difference between the speaking styles of men and women between the 1980s and the 1990s reveals that women are more sensitive to others' face and are found to be more co-operative conversationalists. The notion of having a “women's language” is generally held by the public. The concept represents a normative form of the manner in which women speak, and serves as a “meaning resource” that provides speakers with speakers a resource for deriving and interpreting utterances. The social construction paradigm entails that feminine speech or a feminine style of speech is utilized for achieving specific results. This chapter identifies the prosodic and linguistic characteristics of women's normative speaking.

Keywords:   feminine speech, speech, normative speaking, women's language, speaking style, meaning resource

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