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Through the Looking GlassChina's Foreign Journalists from Opium Wars to Mao$
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Paul French

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9789622099821

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789622099821.001.0001

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The Vultures Descend

The Vultures Descend

Chapter:
(p.87) 4 The Vultures Descend
Source:
Through the Looking Glass
Author(s):

Paul French

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789622099821.003.0005

The major event to consume foreign correspondents in China after the onslaught of the Boxers was the 1904–05 Russo-Japanese War. As it was for modern warfare, the Russo-Japanese War was revolutionary for modern photography. Arguably, the strongest images of the war came from the Russian “Photographer to the Czar” Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii. He was both the official photographer for the Russian side on the Manchurian battlefield and for the Trans-Siberian Railway project. Arriving in China just before the Russo-Japanese War, William Henry Donald was one of the most connected men in China. He cared deeply about China, despite never mastering the language or developing a taste for the cuisine. It also discusses Edwin John Dingle, or Ding Le Mei as he was known in Chinese. With the Russo-Japanese War over, for many foreigners China started to feel cosy again after the danger of the Boxers had seemingly passed.

Keywords:   Russo-Japanese War, China, modern photography, Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii, William Henry Donald, Edwin John Dingle, Ding Le Mei, Boxers

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