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Cantonese Society in Hong Kong and SingaporeGender, Religion, Medicine and Money$
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Marjorie Topley and Jean DeBernardi

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9789888028146

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888028146.001.0001

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Capital, Saving and Credit among Indigenous Rice Farmers and Immigrant Vegetable Farmers in Hong Kong’s New Territories

Capital, Saving and Credit among Indigenous Rice Farmers and Immigrant Vegetable Farmers in Hong Kong’s New Territories

([1964] 2007)*

Chapter:
(p.330) (p.331) Chapter 12 Capital, Saving and Credit among Indigenous Rice Farmers and Immigrant Vegetable Farmers in Hong Kong’s New Territories
Source:
Cantonese Society in Hong Kong and Singapore
Author(s):

Marjorie Topley

, Jean DeBernardi
Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888028146.003.0013

This chapter focuses on master farmers growing rice or vegetables as principal crops. Specialization in vegetable-growing is largely the concern of immigrants, while indigenous farmers, that is people whose ancestors settled in the area generations ago, still specialize mainly in rice production. Rice was formerly the traditional crop of the New Territories, but has declined in importance in the last decade, giving way to market gardening. Increased vegetable production has been carried out mainly on former paddy land. The encouragement to change in farming patterns has been provided by the growth of urban areas since the war, and has been almost entirely due to efforts of immigrants from the vegetable-specializing areas of Kwangtung [Guangdong] province. The first large influx of these farmers was about 1937 when the Japanese invaded South China. Since the establishment of the present regime in China, their numbers have increased considerably.

Keywords:   master farmers, rice, vegetables, principal crops, immigrants, indigenous farmers, vegetable production, farming patterns, Guangdong, China

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