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Stepping Forth into the WorldThe Chinese Educational Mission to the United States, 1872-81$
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Edward J. M. Rhoads

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9789888028863

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888028863.001.0001

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Origins

Origins

Chapter:
(p.7) 1 Origins
Source:
Stepping Forth into the World
Author(s):

Edward J. M. Rhoads

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888028863.003.0002

Down through the nineteenth century, the Confucian classics and their ethical teachings has been the core of Chinese education. To seek knowledge from any other source was considered a waste of time, and worst, a betrayal of cultural norms. However in 1872, the Qing government came to sanction the Chinese Educational Mission (CEM) — a combined result of the vision and lobbying of Yung Wing, the patronage of two influential Qing officials, and, probably, the recent example of Japan. The CEM was, by almost all accounts, the idea of Yung Wing. The United States was chosen as the site of the program on account of the so-called Burlingame Treaty that the Qing had signed with the United States in 1868. Another reason was Wing's familiarity with the country. The knowledge that Japan had recently embarked on a similar program was one of the motivating factors of the Qing court's willingness to sanction the said program.

Keywords:   Confucian classics, Chinese education, Qing court, Yung Wing, United States, Chinese Educational Mission, Burlingame Treaty, Japan

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