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Stepping Forth into the WorldThe Chinese Educational Mission to the United States, 1872-81$
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Edward J. M. Rhoads

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9789888028863

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888028863.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2021. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

The Students in College

The Students in College

Chapter:
(p.115) 8 The Students in College
Source:
Stepping Forth into the World
Author(s):

Edward J. M. Rhoads

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888028863.003.0009

In the 1870s, college education was still very uncommon in the United States. However, in 1876, three of the Chinese Educational Mission (CEM) students had already enrolled in college. Forty-three CEM college students attended ten different schools. Of the ten colleges, only one was a public school. The ten schools, whether public or private, were of three types. One type was the traditional liberal arts school; second was the engineering school; and the last was the comprehensive university offering both curricula. More than half of the CEM students in college pursued science or engineering. The CEM college students were no longer with their original host families for they lived in school dormitories or rented rooms in private homes. Students who had graduated from college were not required to return to China immediately; instead they were encouraged to remain abroad for an additional couple of years to travel and/or gain practical experience.

Keywords:   United States, Chinese Educational Mission, liberal arts school, engineering school, comprehensive university, school dormitories, private homes, travel

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