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Changing Chinese MasculinitiesFrom Imperial Pillars of State to Global Real Men$
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Louie Kam

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9789888208562

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888208562.001.0001

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Corruption, Masculinity, and Jianghu Ideology in the PRC

Corruption, Masculinity, and Jianghu Ideology in the PRC

Chapter:
(p.157) 8 Corruption, Masculinity, and Jianghu Ideology in the PRC
Source:
Changing Chinese Masculinities
Author(s):

John Osburg

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888208562.003.0009

This chapter examines the ways in which networks of entrepreneurs and government officials in the contemporary PRC draw from jianghu ideology and China’s fictive brotherhood tradition to frame their relationships and to situate their often illicit activities. It argues that the moral greyness and uncertainty of business in the first few decades of the reform period resembled that of traditional jianghu occupations. These alliances between businessmen, government officials, and gangsters, which draw from these cultural ideologies of masculinity, constitute the basic underpinnings of corruption in China and are formed through practices of banqueting, drinking, and group carousing. However, given the growing hegemony of the global, cosmopolitan businessman ideal, I predict that these jianghu configurations of masculinity will likely soon return to their traditional place at the margins of Chinese society.

Keywords:   Corruption, masculinity, jianghu, China, entrepreneurs, brotherhood

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