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News Under FireChina's Propaganda against Japan in the English-Language Press, 1928-1941$
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Shuge Wei

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9789888390618

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888390618.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2022. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use.date: 29 June 2022

To Control the Uncontrollable

To Control the Uncontrollable

The Nanjing Government’s International Propaganda Policies, 1928–1931

Chapter:
(p.65) 3 To Control the Uncontrollable
Source:
News Under Fire
Author(s):

Shuge Wei

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888390618.003.0004

Chapter 3 highlights the Nationalist government’s attempts to build an international propaganda system and to control the extraterritoriality-protected treaty-port papers from 1928 to 1932.The top-down information control exercised by the party-led propaganda system conflicted with the liberal journalism practiced in the treaty ports. Unable to achieve diplomatic progress in abolishing extraterritoriality, the Nanjing government made inroads into the extraterritorial system in specific fronts. Press control was one of them. By issuing postal bans, deporting journalists, and reviewing treaties with foreign cable companies, the government sought to strengthen its censorship power. It also adapted to the treaty-port press environment by camouflaging the party’s involvement through transnational covers.

Keywords:   Nanjing government, treaty-port press, extraterritoriality, postal ban, deportation, cable contract, Three People’s Principles, Guomindang, propaganda

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