Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Fixing Inequality in Hong Kong$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Yue Chim Richard Wong

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9789888390625

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888390625.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2020. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use.date: 28 March 2020

Greece and Hong Kong

Greece and Hong Kong

Fiscal Opposites, Same Politics

Chapter:
(p.255) 35 Greece and Hong Kong
Source:
Fixing Inequality in Hong Kong
Author(s):

Yue Chim Richard Wong

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888390625.003.0035

Both Greece and Hong Kong have unified exchange rate regimes. Greece, as a member of the Eurozone, uses the euro as its local monetary unit. Hong Kong, under the linked exchange rate regime, uses a local monetary unit with its currency fully backed by the US dollar at a fixed rate. As a consequence, both economies have surrendered monetary independence to an external monetary authority. Both have committed to not using currency devaluation or revaluation as a policy tool for stabilizing their economies when they are struck by financial and economic shocks. The only way they could regain monetary independence would be, in Greece’s case, exiting the Eurozone and reissuing the drachma, and in Hong Kong’s case, breaking the linked exchange rate and putting in place an alternative monetary arrangement for issuing the Hong Kong dollar. An economy that has joined a unified exchange rate regime will face situations from time to time when the requirements of global economic integration will be in conflict with the requirements of a political democracy.

Keywords:   Global economic integration, Political democracy, Unemployment, Property

Hong Kong Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .