Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Metacinema in Contemporary Chinese Film$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

G. Andrew Stuckey

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9789888390816

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888390816.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2020. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use.date: 27 February 2020

Consumption

Consumption

Genre and Quotation in Goodbye, Dragon Inn

Chapter:
(p.38) 3 Consumption
Source:
Metacinema in Contemporary Chinese Film
Author(s):

G. Andrew Stuckey

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888390816.003.0003

Tsai Ming-liang’s 2003 Goodbye, Dragon Inn depicts a nearly vacant cinema screening King Hu’s martial arts film Dragon Gate Inn (1967) on its last night of business. The film’s composition of the theatre, empty and decaying, marks it as a haunted house, and the few people present as ghosts lingering nostalgically lamenting the theatre’s impending closure. “Consumption,” thus, offers a reading of Goodbye, Dragon Inn attending to the intertextual invocation of Dragon Gate Inn as well as the metacinematic focus of the theatre and its operation through the lens of horror film generic conventions. The ghosts populating the theatre present an alternative temporality that values and seeks to preserve the past. Yet the anomie infecting them, characteristically of Tsai’s films, prevents anything more than a temporary nostalgia that cannot adequately establish the past as a viable temporal mode. In the end, the theatre closes and the ghosts disperse.

Keywords:   Tsai Ming-liang, Goodbye, Dragon Inn, King Hu, Dragon Gate Inn, Taiwanese Film, Horror Film

Hong Kong Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .