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Screening CommunitiesNegotiating Narratives of Empire, Nation, and the Cold War in Hong Kong Cinema$
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Jing Jing Chang

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9789888455768

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888455768.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hongkong.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hong Kong University Press, 2021. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HKSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

Girls in Masquerade

Girls in Masquerade

Celebrity Culture and Fandom in 1960s Hong Kong Youth Film

Chapter:
(p.150) 6 Girls in Masquerade
Source:
Screening Communities
Author(s):

Jing Jing Chang

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888455768.003.0007

Chapter 6 examines the localization of screening community during Hong Kong’s 1960s industrial modernization. It examines the intersections among gendered labor, the Chinese patriarchal family, celebrity culture and fandom, through films starring 1960s idols, Connie Chan Po-chu and Josephine Siao Fong-fong. While fandom and celebrity culture were created by the real demographics of an increasing number of female workers who became Connie’s and Josephine’s fans, their viewership became discursive sites that contributed to the constructions of a gendered community both within and outside of traditional Confucian familial hierarchies. My analysis of films such as Her Tender Love ((Langru chunri feng, dir. Lui Kei, 1969) and Teddy Girls (Fenü zhengzhuan, dir. Lung Kong, 1969) demonstrates that masquerade not only becomes a point of identification for fans, but also a focusing lens for the convergence of seemingly conflicted experiences of teddy girls and factory girls. As much as they embodied the contradictions of urban industrial modernization, factory girls and teddy girls (both on- and off-screen) and their experiences constructed youth fandom as a discursive site for the creative imagining of freedom and empowerment. And both contributed to making and screening of the industrializing and modernizing city that was 1960s Hong Kong.

Keywords:   Celebrity Culture, Fan Culture, Youth film, Teen Idols, 1967 Riots, Factory Girls, Teddy Girls, Industrial Modernity, Working Class, Masquerade

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