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Dividing ASEAN and Conquering the South China SeaChina's Financial Power Projection$
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Daniel C. O'Neill

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9789888455966

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888455966.001.0001

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ASEAN Member States’ Maritime Claims

ASEAN Member States’ Maritime Claims

Chapter:
(p.45) 3 ASEAN Member States’ Maritime Claims
Source:
Dividing ASEAN and Conquering the South China Sea
Author(s):

Daniel C. O'Neill

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888455966.003.0003

This chapter analyzes each ASEAN member state’s territorial claims and disputes both in and outside of the South China Sea as well as its current position regarding ASEAN efforts to negotiate multilaterally with China over rival South China Sea claims. It highlights the broad support for freedom of navigation within ASEAN as well as the stated desire of each government to pursue a peaceful resolution based on the Code of Conduct with China that the ASEAN members agreed to develop in Phnom Penh in 2002. The chapter makes clear that, despite the many overlapping and competing maritime territorial claims among ASEAN member states, these states have managed to cooperate to resolve disputes outside of the South China Sea and, unlike China, since the signing of the DOC have largely refrained from taking provocative actions related to contested claims within the region. The chapter further notes the important differences in the dynamics between, and preferences of, China and the rival ASEAN claimants in the South China Sea when compared to the cases of successful dispute resolution discussed in the chapter; the most obvious difference is the asymmetry in the balance of power between China and the other claimants.

Keywords:   ASEAN, Bay of Bengal, Gulf of Thailand, ITLOS, South China Sea, Southeast Asia, territorial disputes, UNCLOS

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