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Manchukuo PerspectivesTransnational Approaches to Literary Production$
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Annika A. Culver and Norman Smith

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9789888528134

Published to Hong Kong Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.5790/hongkong/9789888528134.001.0001

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“Manchuria” and the Proletarian Literature of Colonial Korea

“Manchuria” and the Proletarian Literature of Colonial Korea

Chapter:
(p.269) 17 “Manchuria” and the Proletarian Literature of Colonial Korea
Source:
Manchukuo Perspectives
Author(s):

Watanabe Naoki

Publisher:
Hong Kong University Press
DOI:10.5790/hongkong/9789888528134.003.0018

This chapter explores the relationship between Korean Agrarian Literature and colonialism in Manchuria. Certain Korean writers dealt with problems arising from Korean farmers flowing into Manchuria and wrote related fiction to regard Korean migrant issues as reflections of their own dilemmas expressed in Korean Proletarian Agrarian Literature. They especially emphasized Manchuria as a place of human reform. However, colonial victimhood transformed into colonialism when they crossed the Tumen River, the border between the Korean Peninsula and Manchuria. This chapter reveals how the ironic shift of subjectivity performed in the process shows how Korean ethnic nationalism was domesticated into imperial logic

Keywords:   Lee Ki-yeong, Han Seol-ya, Im Hwa, Yi T’aejunm, Korean Proletarian Literature, collective memory

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